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The ethics of party hopping

“Bagi pihak Parti Keadilan Rakyat (PKR) Kedah kita amat kesal dengan sikap yang tidak bertanggungjawab ini. Telah menjadi satu kebiasaan apabila ada pilihanraya kecil, akan ada isu-isu lompat parti. Kita menjangkakan ini adalah sebahagian daripada tindakan yang dirancang oleh Barisan Nasional (BN) untuk memanipulasi isu menjelang pilihanraya kecil Permatang Pasir pada 25 Ogos nanti …

“Pimpinan Parti Keadilan Kedah juga dengan ini mendesak YB Radzhi juga untuk meletak jawatan sebagai Adun Lunas.”

AHMAD Kasim, Kedah PKR chief, on Lunas state assemblyperson and state executive councillor Mohd Radzhi Salleh’s resignation from PKR to become an independent. (Source: Kenyataan PKR Kedah Berhubung Pengisytiharan Keluar Adun Lunas, Anwar Ibrahim’s blog, 23 Aug 2009)

During the Bukit Selambau by-election in April 2009, however, PKR adviser Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim welcomed thousands of former People’s Progressive Party (PPP) members, including ex-PPP vice-president Datuk V Nadarajan, into PKR’s fold right before polling day on 7 April.

“Saya melihat ini sebagai satu permulaan baru dan anjakan perubahan dalam Pakatan Rakyat.”

Anwar, back when Umno’s Bota state assemblyperson in Perak, Datuk Nasarudin Hashim, crossed over to PKR in January 2009. (Source: ADUN Bota sertai PKR, BN Perak bincang, mStar Online, 26 Jan 2009)

In fact, Anwar reiterated on his blog: “Kehadiran [Datuk] Nasarudin amat membanggakan kita. Kelayakan akademik, pengalaman pentadbiran dan politik serta sosok peribadi sederhana dan berhemah tambah memantapkan pimpinan KeADILan Perak khususnya.”

“We don’t agree with this (PAS representatives joining BN) because it is not good for them … this (PAS) struggle is right but they want to run to the wrong side. There is something wrong here. It is right for the others to want to join PAS. This is not a double standard but a principle in terms of humanity.”

Current PAS secretary-general, Datuk Mustafa Ali, weighing in on the ethics of Nasarudin’s crossover from Umno to its Pakatan Rakyat partner, PKR. (Source: Right time to enact anti-hop law: Pairin, theSun, 29 Jan 2009)

Ten days after joining PKR, Nasarudin rejoined Umno on 4 Feb. Favicon

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2 Responses to “The ethics of party hopping”

  1. Crossing the floor is a lot like sex. When it’s done out of true love for the other person, it is something wonderful & even spiritual. On the other hand, if done out of greed for money, fame or power, it becomes debased & immoral, and those who indulge in it are called prostitutes.

    Similarly, an elected representative may cross the floor because he agrees with & respects the policies & positions of another party (or finds that of his own party unconscionable). Alternatively, he or she may just do so for more selfish reasons, (such as to avoid selective prosecution, or to get a new car).

    One way to differentiate one from the other might be to introduce the recall election. This is a procedure by which voters can remove elected officials. So, in the case of a YB who crossed the floor, we could require that an automatic recall election be held. He or she would have ample opportunity to share with the Rakyat his reasons for switching, and how his actions were in their best interests. The rakyat would then vote to indicate if they still wanted him as their representative. The YB would have every right to act according to his conscience, and the Rakyat’s right to representation that serves their interests would not be sacrificed.

  2. Azmi says:

    I agree wholeheartedly with Malaysian Heart’s sentiments but unfortunately all those who have changed parties have not gone back to the voters for a recall election. I guess they do not have the voters interests at heart.


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